Richard Rosen

Richard Rosen

Richard Rosen is a former Fellow and founding board member of the Tellus Institute. He has thirty-five years of experience in energy sector resource planning and management, as well as environmental compliance. In the 1990s, Dr. Rosen’s research has focused on the economics and feasibility of restructuring and deregulating the electricity utility industry. In a wide variety of regulatory and public planning settings, he has presented detailed analyses of alternative energy supply options, renewable resources, environmental impacts, energy efficiency technologies, and integrated electric power plans. His current research focus is on alternative economic visions and models for the global economy over the long-term, including new approaches to the allocation of capital needed for sustainability and the regulation of investments. He holds a PhD in Physics from Columbia University.

GTI Contributions
Richard Rosen
Commentary on The Degrowth Alternative

February 2015





Richard Rosen
Commentary on Meaning, Religion, and a Great Transition

December 2014





The Century Ahead: Searching for Sustainability
The Century Ahead: Searching for Sustainability

August 2010

This study explores possible pathways to sustainability by considering, in quantitative form, four contrasting scenarios for the twenty-first century. The analysis reveals vividly the risks of conventional development approaches and the real danger of socio-ecological descent into a future of diminished human and ecological well-being. Nonetheless, the paper underscores that a Great Transition scenario—turning toward a civilization of enhanced human well-being and environmental resilience—remains an option, and it identifies a suite of changes in strategic policies and human values for getting there.

Originally published in Sustainability



Nuclear Power: Should It Have a Role?
Nuclear Power: Should It Have a Role?

June 2009

Adequate mitigation of the risks of climate change requires rapid displacement of fossil fuels with carbon-free energy sources. This imperative has prompted a growing chorus of energy analysts, policy makers, and industry advocates to press for a resurgence of nuclear energy. Even some environmentalists are urging reconsideration of the nuclear option, so long anathema to their own movement. Yet, with critical problems unsolved—safety and cost, waste storage, and nuclear weapons proliferation—nuclear power remains a deeply problematic response to the climate challenge, and to the wider challenge of global sustainability. Therefore, the transformative energy strategy of a Great Transition relies on three major prongs: renewable resources, deep efficiency, and a model of development based on environment-sparing consumption and production patterns.



Visions of Regional Economies in a Great Transition World
Visions of Regional Economies in a Great Transition World

Rich Rosen and David Schweickart analyze the dominant models of capitalism and socialism from the twentieth century to identify key lessons learned that must be kept in mind in building a more just, equitable, and sustainable economic system. They then proceed to outline three model economic arrangements that would embody the values of a Great Transition future.